Things

...that I like to think about.

Sep 25
luzfosca:

Robert Doisneau
Leçon de vélo [Bike Lesson], 1961.
source

luzfosca:

Robert Doisneau

Leçon de vélo [Bike Lesson], 1961.

source

(via nprfreshair)


Sep 20

erikkwakkel:

The splendor of Strahov Library

I am typing this while looking at the building where these images were taken: the library of Strahov Abbey, towering high above Prague. While the monastery was established in 1143, the library dates from 1720. It is one of the most impressive I have visited: thousands of books placed in what looks more like a museum than a library. I hope you get a sense of the atmosphere from these images.

Pics (my own): Strahov Abbey Library, Prague.


Sep 12


Sep 3
explore-blog:

The Shortness of Life – Seneca on busyness and the art of living wide rather than living long, spectacular read.

explore-blog:

The Shortness of LifeSeneca on busyness and the art of living wide rather than living long, spectacular read.


Aug 10
“You can learn a lot about a person from the way he or she eats — about the extent of his physical appetites and the way they are satisfied.” The 1962 gem The Seducer’s Cookbook explores what your food preferences reveal about you and your partner. (via explore-blog)


Aug 9

Aug 6
erikkwakkel:

World’s oldest animation
You are looking at a GIF of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau and it is the world’s oldest animation. The disk above is one of the oldest to survive and it shows the remarkable resemblance to our modern GIF: they both create motion where there is none. It is simply mesmerizing. 
Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif (of a 19th-century phenakistiscope). Here is another one, which I posted some time ago.
Note: as one follower noted, there are older animation-like devices. Greek vases from Antiquity hold sequential images; when spun, they show a running person. Read more about this “precursor to animation” here. The vase would make for a great GIF, if the museum lets you!

erikkwakkel:

World’s oldest animation

You are looking at a GIF of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau and it is the world’s oldest animation. The disk above is one of the oldest to survive and it shows the remarkable resemblance to our modern GIF: they both create motion where there is none. It is simply mesmerizing.

Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif (of a 19th-century phenakistiscope). Here is another one, which I posted some time ago.

Note: as one follower noted, there are older animation-like devices. Greek vases from Antiquity hold sequential images; when spun, they show a running person. Read more about this “precursor to animation” here. The vase would make for a great GIF, if the museum lets you!


Jul 24
explore-blog:

Brilliant: Open Culture digs up the perfect Japanese word for our “guilt pile” of unread materials. Best approached with another untranslatable Japanese concept, wu-wei.

explore-blog:

Brilliant: Open Culture digs up the perfect Japanese word for our “guilt pile” of unread materials. Best approached with another untranslatable Japanese concept, wu-wei.


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