Things

...that I like to think about.

Sep 12


Sep 3
explore-blog:

The Shortness of Life – Seneca on busyness and the art of living wide rather than living long, spectacular read.

explore-blog:

The Shortness of LifeSeneca on busyness and the art of living wide rather than living long, spectacular read.


Aug 10
“You can learn a lot about a person from the way he or she eats — about the extent of his physical appetites and the way they are satisfied.” The 1962 gem The Seducer’s Cookbook explores what your food preferences reveal about you and your partner. (via explore-blog)


Aug 9

Aug 6
erikkwakkel:

World’s oldest animation
You are looking at a GIF of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau and it is the world’s oldest animation. The disk above is one of the oldest to survive and it shows the remarkable resemblance to our modern GIF: they both create motion where there is none. It is simply mesmerizing. 
Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif (of a 19th-century phenakistiscope). Here is another one, which I posted some time ago.
Note: as one follower noted, there are older animation-like devices. Greek vases from Antiquity hold sequential images; when spun, they show a running person. Read more about this “precursor to animation” here. The vase would make for a great GIF, if the museum lets you!

erikkwakkel:

World’s oldest animation

You are looking at a GIF of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau and it is the world’s oldest animation. The disk above is one of the oldest to survive and it shows the remarkable resemblance to our modern GIF: they both create motion where there is none. It is simply mesmerizing.

Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif (of a 19th-century phenakistiscope). Here is another one, which I posted some time ago.

Note: as one follower noted, there are older animation-like devices. Greek vases from Antiquity hold sequential images; when spun, they show a running person. Read more about this “precursor to animation” here. The vase would make for a great GIF, if the museum lets you!


Jul 24
explore-blog:

Brilliant: Open Culture digs up the perfect Japanese word for our “guilt pile” of unread materials. Best approached with another untranslatable Japanese concept, wu-wei.

explore-blog:

Brilliant: Open Culture digs up the perfect Japanese word for our “guilt pile” of unread materials. Best approached with another untranslatable Japanese concept, wu-wei.


Jul 4

50watts:

polish-vintage:

the—dream—machine:

Stills from Adam 2, a feature-length animated film by Jan Lenica, master Polish animator and graphic designer. As far as I know this is currently unavailable and I can’t manage to find a copy floating around the internet. It looks absolutely stunning, a tantalising glimpse of his wonderful graphics come to life. His other short films are well worth tracking down, Dom, his collaboration with Walerian Borowczyk and Labirynt are both available on the Anthology of Polish Animated Film DVD. Also Rhinoceros from 1965 is currently on Vimeo.

See some more scans in a 2011 post at Cardboard Cutout Sundown.


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